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ISBN
PascalGarnierComplete

Publication date
20th November 2020

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Gallic Noir – A Complete Collection of Pascal Garnier’s Short, Sharp, Addictive Novels

Author Pascal Garnier

£108.88 £85.00

Gallic Books presents a selection of forgotten classics by incredible women who deserve to be celebrated, with the first three titles in the series published in Autumn 2020.

This title is not yet published, but can be pre-ordered

Description

‘Garnier’s darkness is of the kind that only astronauts get to see, gleaming, depthless, yet dotted throughout with mysterious points of light at once ice-cold and curiously consoling.’ John Banville, New York Review of Books 

Pascal Garnier was a talented novelist, short story writer, children’s author and painter. From his home in the mountains of the Ardèche, he wrote fiction in a noir palette with a cast of characters drawn from ordinary provincial life. Though his writing is often very dark in tone, it sparkles with beautiful imagery and dry wit. The author boasts a glittering literary fan club with members such as John Banville, Ian Rankin and A. L. Kennedy, and his short, sharp books have an almost addictive quality to them. Once you try one, it is almost impossible to resist returning for another taste.

This collection features all 12 individual titles, including a new edition of How’s the Pain?, featuring an introduction from John Banville.

 

The Panda Theory

Gabriel is a stranger in a small Breton town. Nobody knows where he came from or why he’s here. Yet his small acts of kindness, and exceptional cooking, quickly earn him acceptance from the locals.

His new friends grow fond of Gabriel, who seems as reserved and benign as the toy panda he wins at the funfair.

But unlike Gabriel, the fluffy toy is not haunted by his past . . .

How’s the Pain?

Death is Simon’s business. And now the ageing vermin exterminator is preparing to die. But he still has one last job down on the coast, and he needs a driver.

Bernard is twenty-one. He can drive and he’s never seen the sea. He can’t pass up the chance to chauffeur for Simon, whatever his mother may say.

As the unlikely pair set off on their journey, Bernard soon finds that Simon’s definition of vermin is broader than he’d expected . . .

This Editions Gallic volume features and introduction by John Banville

The A26

The future is on its way to Picardy with the construction of a huge motorway. But nearby is a house where nothing has changed since 1945.

Traumatised by events in 1945, Yolande hasn’t left her home since, and life has not been kinder to Bernard, her brother, who is now in the final months of a terminal illness.

Realising that he has so little time left, Bernard’s gloom suddenly lifts. With nothing left to lose, he becomes reckless – and murderous.

Moon in a Dead Eye

Pascal Garnier turns his dark vision and ruthless wit to the inhabits of a retirement village in the south of France.

Given the choice, Martial would not have moved to Les Conviviales. But Odette loved the idea of a brand-new retirement village in the south of France. So that was that.

At first it feels like a terrible mistake: they’re the only residents and it’s raining non-stop. Then three neighbours arrive, the sun comes out, and life becomes far more interesting and agreeable. Until, that is, some gypsies set up camp just outside their gated community . . .

The Front Seat Passenger

Fabien and Sylvie had both known their marriage was no longer working. And yet when Sylvie is involved in a fatal car accident, her husband is stunned to discover that she had a lover who died alongside her.

With thoughts of revenge on his mind, Fabien decides to find out about the lover’s widow, Martine, first by stalking her, then by breaking into her home. He really needs to get Martine on her own. But she never goes anywhere without her formidable best friend, Madeleine…

The Islanders

It’s a few days before Christmas in Versailles. Olivier has come to bury his mother, but the impending holidays and icy conditions have delayed the funeral.

While trapped in limbo at his mother’s flat, a chance encounter brings Olivier back in touch with childhood friend Jeanne and her blind brother, Rodolphe.

Rodolphe suggests they have dinner together, along with a homeless man he’s taken in. As the wine flows, dark secrets are spilled, and there’s more than just hangovers to deal with the next morning . . .

Boxes

He was the sole survivor of the natural disaster that at one time or another strikes us all, known as ‘moving house’.

Brice and Emma had bought their new home in the countryside together. And then Emma disappeared. Now, as he awaits her return, Brice busies himself with DIY and walks around the village.

He gradually comes to know his new neighbours including Blanche, an enigmatic woman in white, who has lived on her own in the big house by the graveyard since the death of her father, to whom Brice bears a curious resemblance . . .

Too Close to the Edge

A widow’s quiet retirement in the foothills of the Alps is turned upside down by the arrival of a mysterious stranger.

Recently widowed grandmother Éliette is returning to her home in the mountains when her micro-car breaks down. A stranger comes to her aid on foot. Éliette offers him a lift, glad of the interruption to her humdrum routine.

That night, her neighbours’ son is killed in a road accident. Could the tragedy be linked to the arrival of her good Samaritan?

The Eskimo Solution

A children’s writer rents a house on the Normandy coast where he plans to write his first crime novel. There, away from his love life, his editor and his friends, he’ll be free to pen the story of Louis, who after killing his mother, is inspired to relieve his friends of their own burdensome elderly relatives.

But even far away from everything he knows, distractions seem to find their way to his door: from his lovable elderly neighbours, to his girlfriend’s tearaway teenage daughter. And somehow, events from his life appear to overlap with those of his imagination . . .

Low Heights

At least vultures have the decency to wait until their prey’s dead before picking it apart . . .

After losing his wife and suffering a stroke, cantankerous retiree Édouard Lavenant has moved from Lyon to a village in the mountains with his put-upon nurse, Thérèse. One day, a man comes to the door claiming to be Édouard’s long-lost son. Édouard’s temper seems to be softening, but it isn’t long before the local vultures are circling overhead . . .

C’est la Vie

‘Happiness for those unused to it is like food for the starving – a little too much can be fatal.’

Writer Jeff Colombier is not accustomed to success. Twice divorced with a grown-up son he barely sees, he drinks too much and his books don’t sell.

Then he wins a big literary prize and his life changes for ever. Overwhelmed by his newfound wealth and happiness, he feels the need to escape and recapture his lost youth, taking his son, Damien, with him. And if strange encounters lead them down dangerous paths . . . well, c’est la vie.

A Long Way Off

Marc dreams of going somewhere far, far away – but he’ll start by taking his cat and his grown-up daughter, Anne, to an out-of-season resort on the Channel.

Reluctant to go home, the curious threesome head south for Agen, whose main claim to fame is its prunes. As their impromptu road trip takes ever stranger turns, the trail of destruction – and mysterious disappearances – mounts up in their wake.

Shocking, hilarious and poignant, this final book from Pascal Garnier, published shortly before his death, is the author on top form.

 

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